Sharjah’s ‘Tales from the East’ show power of Arab culture

The week-long exhibition has concluded, paying tribute to human achievement in the form of rare books, manuscripts and artefacts. The exhibition has bolstered Sharjah’s status as a beacon of science, culture and knowledge.

‘Tales from the East,’ Sharjah Book Authority (SBA)’s week-long exhibition to spread awareness about the region’s glorious past, concluded at the SBA headquarters. The seven-day tribute to humankind’s past glories aimed to educate the public through the formative work of scientists, innovators and thought leaders that over hundreds of years has informed and influenced current technological feats.

‘Tales from the East’ showcased a collection of centuries-old books and manuscripts along with rare artefacts, collectively valued at more than Dhs60 million.

Ahmed Bin Rakkad Al Ameri, Chairman of SBA, said: “The exhibition was a unique opportunity to learn about the power and influence of Arab and Islamic culture on human civilisation over the centuries,” as it enabled visitors to journey back in time to explore some of the most significant sources of knowledge and sciences that have shaped our understanding of history.

“The exhibition affirms the truth that acquiring knowledge is a continuous and cumulative journey which transcends all physical boundaries and can be transmitted to generations across centuries,” he further noted.

“’Tales from the East’ served as a window that offered insights into the formative works of great minds, and reinforced that the true value of manuscripts lies not only in their content but also in their importance as a valuable work of preserved art. Manuscripts help us decode many unique aspects of the era in which they were written, the prevalent beliefs and values of the time, and the creativity inherent during that period,” Al Ameri continued.

He concluded saying that this exhibition has “bolstered Sharjah’s status as a beacon of science, culture, knowledge and reflects the vision of His Highness Dr. Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohammed Al Qasimi, Member of the Supreme Council and Ruler of Sharjah, to preserve the cultural and intellectual legacy of humankind and ensure its preservation and continuity.”

The week-long exhibition also hosted several engaging and enlightening cultural sessions and panel discussions led by eminent historians and experts. These sessions not only shed light on the importance of preserving ancient manuscripts for upcoming generations, but also provided insight into the challenges being faced thereof.

Among the unique items showcased as part of Tales from the East were rare early editions and manuscripts of the Holy Quran dating back hundreds of years. Description of Egypt, a 23-part collaborative work of scholars, scientists, artists, and technicians who followed Napoleon Bonaparte to Egypt in the early 19th century, drew vast crowds.

The exhibits included the first edition of Katib Çelebi’s The Mirror of the World, published in in 1732; 17th-century globes, and other singular range of artefacts. Visitors also got the opportunity to appreciate the beauty and aesthetics of Arabic calligraphy that spanned centuries.

Earlier, the science, skill and passion of a community of professionals who have dedicated their lives to saving centuries-old books and preserving historical knowledge for future generations, was the centre of a fascinating discussion led by experts at the ‘Tales from the East’ Exhibition organised by the Sharjah Book Authority (SBA).

The panel discussion titled ‘The Life of Manuscripts’ was led by Dr. Bassam Daghistani, Head of Maintenance, Treatment and Restoration of the Manuscript Section at Juma Al Majid Centre for Culture and Heritage; and Hugo Wetscherek, owner of Austria-based Antiquariat Inlibris, who took their audiences on a behind-the-scenes journey of what exactly goes into repairing and restoring priceless ancient texts spanning different eras.

“How do we perform the complex work of manuscript restoration at the Juma Al Majid Centre?”, questioned Dr. Bassam, following up with an elaborate and interesting answer. The panel’s audience learned about the fine details in the steps his team of restorers follow to breathe life back into old, battered books, manuscripts and other printed materials the centre receives.

From sterilising the pages of a book to remove fungi and other harmful microorganisms that live off the starch and sugars held by the paper, to dry cleaning, removing acidity by restoring the book’s pH levels, and finally, re-moisturising the restored book before storing them in temperature- and weather-controlled storage areas to ensure that the restored book can enjoy a hospitable environment for a long period of time, Dr. Bassam shared a detailed account.

Weeklong exhibition ‘Tales from the East’ concludes in Sharjah

Exhibition showed formative works of great minds in the Arab world

Sharjah: The weeklong exhibition, Tales from the East, organised by Sharjah Book Authority (SBA), recently concluded after offering visitors insights into the formative works of the region’s greatest minds.

From centuries-old books to ancient manuscripts and rare artefacts, collectively valued at more than Dh60 million, “Tales from the East paid tribute to humankind’s past glories aimed at educating the public through the formative work of scientists, innovators and thought leaders that over hundreds of years have influenced current technological feats,” SBA noted.

Arab influence on human civilisation

Ahmed bin Rakkad Al Ameri, SBA chairman, noted: “The exhibition was a unique opportunity to learn about the power and influence of Arab and Islamic culture on human civilisation over the centuries. The exhibition affirmed the truth that acquiring knowledge is a continuous and cumulative journey which transcends all physical boundaries and can be transmitted to generations across centuries.”

He added: “Tales from the East served as a window that offered insights into the formative works of great minds, and reinforced that the true value of manuscripts lies not only in their content but also in its importance as a valuable work of preserved art. Manuscripts help us decode many unique aspects of the era in which it was written, the prevalent beliefs and values of the time, and the creativity inherent during that period.

“The exhibition bolstered Sharjah’s status as a beacon of science, culture, knowledge and reflects the vision of His Highness Dr. Sheikh Sultan bin Muhammad Al Qasimi, Member of the Supreme Council and Ruler of Sharjah, to preserve the cultural and intellectual legacy of humankind and ensure its preservation and continuity,” Al Ameri continued.

Rare Holy Quran manuscripts

Among the unique items showcased at Tales from the East were rare and early manuscripts of the Quran. Also displayed was ‘Description of Egypt’, a 23-part collaborative work of scholars, scientists, artists, and technicians who followed Napoleon Bonaparte to Egypt in the early 19th century.

Also exhibited was the first edition of Katib Çelebi’s The Mirror of the World that was published in 1732. There were also 17th century globes, and other artefacts. Visitors also got the opportunity to appreciate the beauty and aesthetics of Arabic calligraphy that spanned centuries.

Sharjah Ruler opens weeklong ‘Tales from the East’ exhibition

Dh60 million worth of rare manuscripts, artefacts showcased in Sharjah

Sharjah: The ‘Tales from the East’ exhibition of rare books and artefacts worth over Dh60 million was officially opened on Tuesday in Sharjah.

His Highness Dr Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohammad Al Qasimi, Member of the Supreme Council and Ruler of Sharjah, inaugurated the exhibition, organised by the Sharjah Book Authority (SBA) at its headquarters.

The seven-day event, concluding on May 3, showcases early written material, including books, manuscripts and a collection of rare artefacts.

Personal collections

Following the inauguration, Dr Sheikh Sultan was briefed on the historic items on display and provided with detailed information on the various sections of the exhibition and their valuable contents. The exhibition turns the spotlight on the personal belongings of Abdul Rahman Bin Mohammad Al Owais, Minister of Health and Prevention and Minister of State for Federal National Council Affairs; and Mohammad Al Murr, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Mohammad Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Library, and showcases items from the Juma Al Majid Centre for Culture and Heritage.

Separate sections

The exhibition is divided into five sections. The first contains manuscripts of the Quran dating back hundreds of years and reveals the art of transcribing that spanned across centuries. Old paintings and photos of landmarks and cities, including Mecca during the Haj season, and Sharjah and Dubai, can be viewed in the second section.

Maps and globes from the 17th and 18th centuries are on display in the third section, which also houses the Description of Egypt, comprising of 23 volumes, that is a collaborative work between scientists, artists, and technicians who followed Napoleon Bonaparte to Egypt.

The fourth section is home to the first and early editions of manuscripts and famous literary works covering fiction, theatrical works, politics, history and other genres. It also has translations in various languages of the ‘Thousand and One Nights’. The last section showcases a large collection of old paintings and advertisement posters for airlines, railways, tourism and exhibitions from a number of Middle East and North African countries.

Panel discussions

On the sidelines of the exhibition, SBA is organising a series of cultural sessions and panel discussions that brings together history and archaeology experts to discuss the role of manuscripts in unveiling the scientific and cultural achievements of humankind, and address the importance of its preservation for future generations.

Rare manuscripts and artifacts on display at SBA’s Tales from the East exhibition

SHARJAH — The Sharjah Book Authority (SBA) is organizing a unique exhibition of early written material including books, pamphlets and manuscripts, and a collection of rare artifacts, at its headquarters in Sharjah from April 27 to May 3, 2021. Titled, Tales from the East, and open from 8 p.m. to midnight each day, the exhibition will also enable the public to engage with academic experts to acquire knowledge and gain exceptional insight into the region’s rich cultural past.

Eminent history and archaeology experts will lead the cultural sessions and panel discussions during the weeklong exhibition to discuss the role of manuscripts in unveiling the scientific and cultural achievements of humankind, and address the importance of its preservation for future generations.

Distinguished scholars, Dr. Ali Bin Ibrahim Al Namlah, former minister of labor and social affairs in Saudi Arabia and Dr. Ahmed Mohamed Obaid, a UAE writer and researcher, will discuss the challenges and importance of preserving ancient manuscripts for upcoming generations at a session titled, ‘The Future of Manuscripts’, which will be held on Wednesday, April 28, at 10 p.m.

Dr. Abdulwahid Al Nabawi, former Egyptian minister of culture and professor of History at the Al Azhar University in Cairo; and Dr. Mohammed Kamel, general manager of Juma Al Majid Centre for Culture and Heritage in Dubai, will lead the session titled ‘Manuscripts in the Age of Digital Transformation’ on Friday, April 30, at 10 p.m. They will discuss the different phases of preserving old texts and manuscripts and explore techniques of harnessing technological tools to digitize ancient written works that can then be shared with research centers, universities, libraries, and other relevant entities.

On Sunday, May 2, at 10 p.m., Hugo Wetscherek, founder of Antiquariat Inlibris, and Dr. Bassam Daghistani, head of maintenance, treatment and restoration of the manuscript section at Juma Al Majid Centre for Culture and Heritage will share their unique insights at the discussion titled, ‘The Life of Manuscripts’. Showcasing the Arab and international experience in preserving priceless ancient texts spanning different eras, they will highlight the efforts of museums and specialized centers to protect and restore manuscripts, be it for purposes of display or research.

Ahmed Bin Rakkad Al Ameri, chairman of SBA said: “By hosting Tales from the East, SBA aims to explore and connect with important aspects of our shared human history and knowledge. This is in line with the vision of cultural renaissance set forward by Sheikh Dr. Sultan bin Muhammad Al Qasimi, member of the Supreme Council and ruler of Sharjah, which aims to build a knowledge-based economy and drive social development by promoting cross-cultural communication between people and nations.”

Al Ameri added: “The key message of the exhibition is to showcase to the new generations how the formative work of scientists, innovators and thought leaders over hundreds of years has informed and influenced current technological feats, and why our mission today is to continue this journey and work harder to foster greater historic milestones.”

SBA will organize the exhibition in conformance with the stringent COVID-19 precautionary protocols in the UAE. Halls and panel discussion areas will be sanitized regularly, while all exits and entrances will have thermal scanners. In addition, precautionary practices such as face masks and social distancing will be mandatory throughout the 7-day event.

Sharjah to organise a unique exhibition of books, pamphlets and manuscripts

Sharjah Book Authority will also host scholars, experts from April 27 to May 3

Sharjah: The Sharjah Book Authority (SBA) is organising a unique exhibition of early written material, including books, pamphlets and manuscripts, and a collection of rare artefacts, at its headquarters in Sharjah from April 27 to May 3, 2021.

Titled ‘Tales from the East’, and open from 8pm to midnight each day, the exhibition will also enable the public to engage with academic experts to acquire knowledge and gain an insight into the region’s rich cultural past.

Eminent history and archaeology experts will lead the cultural sessions and panel discussions during the week-long exhibition to discuss the role of manuscripts in unveiling the scientific and cultural achievements of humankind, and address the importance of its preservation for future generations.

Distinguished scholars Dr Ali Bin Ibrahim Al Namlah, former minister of labour and Social Affairs in Saudi Arabia, and Dr Ahmed Mohamed Obaid, a UAE writer and researcher, will discuss the challenges and importance of preserving ancient manuscripts for future generations at a session titled ‘The Future of Manuscripts’, which will be held on Wednesday, April 28, at 10pm.

Dr Abdulwahid Al Nabawi, former Egyptian minister of culture and professor of History at Al Azhar University in Cairo; and Dr Mohammed Kamel, general manager of Juma Al Majid Centre for Culture and Heritage in Dubai will lead the session titled ‘Manuscripts in the Age of Digital Transformation’ on Friday, April 30, at 10pm. They will discuss the different phases of preserving old texts and manuscripts and explore techniques of harnessing technological tools to digitise ancient written works that can then be shared with research centres, universities, libraries, and other relevant entities.

On Sunday, May 2, at 10pm, Hugo Wetscherek, founder of Antiquariat Inlibris, and Dr Bassam Daghistani, head of Maintenance, Treatment and Restoration of the Manuscript Section at Juma Al Majid Centre for Culture and Heritage, will share their unique insights during the discussion titled, ‘The Life of Manuscripts’. Showcasing the Arab and international experience in preserving priceless ancient texts spanning different eras, they will highlight the efforts of museums and specialised centres to protect and restore manuscripts, be it for purposes of display or research.

Ahmed bin Rakkad Al Ameri, chairman of SBA said: “By hosting Tales from the East, SBA aims to explore and connect with important aspects of our shared human history and knowledge. This is in line with the vision of cultural renaissance set forward by His Highness Dr Sheikh Sultan bin Muhammad Al Qasimi, Member of the Supreme Council and Ruler of Sharjah, which aims to build a knowledge-based economy and drive social development by promoting cross-cultural communication between people and nations.”

Al Ameri added: “The key message of the exhibition is to showcase to the new generations how the formative work of scientists, innovators and thought leaders over hundreds of years has informed and influenced current technological feats, and why our mission today is to continue this journey and work harder to foster greater historic milestones.”

SBA will organise the exhibition in compliance with stringent COVID-19 precautionary protocol in the UAE. Halls and panel discussion areas will be sanitised regularly, while all exits and entrances will have thermal scanners. In addition, wearing of face masks and maintaining of social distancing will be mandatory throughout the seven-day event.

Bücher und Grafik: Das alles gibt es im Netz

Antiquariatsmessen in Stuttgart und Ludwigsburg: Die Messen für Bücher und Kunst auf Papier finden diesmal ausschließlich im Internet statt. Wer ein preiswertes Unikat erwerben will, muss schnell sein.

Wiesbaden. Bücher über das Internet zu verkaufen ist heute Standard – und die Konkurrenz ist groß. Die beiden Antiquariatsmessen in Stuttgart und Ludwigsburg mussten sich etwas einfallen lassen, da ihre Veranstaltungen zum gewohnten Termin Ende Januar nicht stattfinden können. Statt einer Verschiebung haben sich die Schwestermessen zu virtuellen Terminen entschlossen, die auf ähnliche Konzepte setzen. Auf einen gedruckten Katalog möchten beide nicht verzichten. Das unterscheidet die Antiquariats- von den Kunstmessen, deren Onlineausgaben bisher ausnahmslos rein digital geblieben sind.

Die Antiquaria Ludwigsburg möchte auch im virtuellen Raum eine persönliche Verbindung zwischen Ausstellern und Besuchern herstellen und versucht dies mit Porträtfotos. Das mag bieder oder banal erscheinen, ist aber in der ansonsten vorherrschenden gesichtslosen Anonymität des Internets ein sympathischer Zug. Der Onlinekatalog ist schon länger freigeschaltet, doch für die ursprüngliche Eröffnung am 28. Januar um 15 Uhr sollen weitere Offerten der 53 Aussteller freigeschaltet werden, um zumindest ein wenig „Buzz“ zu erzeugen. […]

Ein älteres Objekt als die sumerische Tontafel, die Inlibris und Kotte Autographs für 5000 Euro anbieten, dürfte bei kaum einem Antiquariat zu finden sein: Auf die Zeit um 2300 vor Christus wird das Schriftstück datiert – in einer Expertise aus dem Jahr 1900.

Vor dem Kulturgutschutzgesetz müssen sich potenzielle Käufer also nicht fürchten. Der Inhalt des Textes ist so profan wie sakral, verzeichnet er doch die Einnahmen eines Tempels. Das teuerste Objekt des Katalogs ist ebenfalls hier zu finden: eine Urkunde des letzten Stauferkaisers Friedrich II. aus dem Jahr 1226 für 475.000 Euro. […]

Die Stuttgarter Antiquariatsmesse, organisiert vom Verband Deutscher Antiquare, hat mit ihren 76 Teilnehmern bereits seit Herbst ein Präludium mit Lesungen und Gesprächen im Internet, die weiterhin abrufbar sind. Auch hier setzt der Veranstalter auf Öffnungszeiten, die an die reguläre Laufzeit angelehnt sind. Auf die Art dürfte zum Angebotsvolumen des Katalogs, das der Veranstalter auf elf Millionen Euro beziffert, noch einiges hinzukommen.

Für knapp ein Viertel dieser Summe ist der Eintrag von Jörn Günther aus Basel verantwortlich, der mit einer französischen „Vita Christi“ aus den Jahren 1506 bis 1508 von Ludolphus Carthusiensis für 2,2 Millionen Euro und einer Erstausgabe des „Theuerdank“-Romans von Kaiser Maximilian I. für 850.000 Euro aufwartet.

In der gleichen Preisliga spielt Inlibris aus Wien, das beide Messen beschickt. In Stuttgart ist Andreas Vesalius“ Anatomie-Inkunabel „De humani corporis fabrica libri septem“ in der Basler Erstausgabe von 1543 zu 950.000 Euro das Prunkstück. […]

Firsts online

Virtual event

E-Mail: bookfairs@aba.org.uk
Internet: https://www.firsts-online.com/

Verschollener Kauffmann-Brief aufgetaucht

Das Franz-Michael-Felder-Archiv hat einen lange verschollen geglaubten Brief der Malerin Angelika Kauffmann (1741 bis 1807) erworben. Durch die Unterstützung eines Mäzenaten-Ehepaars konnte das 1792 an den deutschen Schriftsteller und Aufklärer Christoph Martin Wieland gerichtete Schriftstück um 9.500 Euro gekauft werden.

Am 18. November 1792 schreibt Angelika Kauffmann aus Rom an Wieland, dass sie sich über sein Interesse an ihren Arbeiten freue und sie gerne einige Zeichnungen für seinen „Oberon“ beisteuern könne. Er möge ihr doch einige Stellen nennen, nach denen sie zeichnen solle.

Der Brief, in dem diese Zeilen zu lesen sind, galt seit mehr als 100 Jahren als verschollen. Es war lediglich eine Abschrift bekannt, die um 1900 gemacht wurde. Der Originalbrief tauchte kürzlich auf dem Antiquariatsmarkt wieder auf.

Für Öffentlichkeit zugänglich

Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts hatte sich der Brief in der Autographensammlung des Grafen Victor von Wimpffen befunden, ehe die Sammlung kurz nach 1900 verkauft und versteigert wurde.

Auch der Brief von Angelika Kauffmann fand damals einen neuen Besitzer, verschwand in der Dunkelheit einer privaten Sammlung, aus der er erst vor kurzem wieder auftauchte. Durch die Erwerbung für das Felder-Archiv soll er nun für die Öffentlichkeit zugänglich gemacht werden.

Wertvolle Ergänzung der Autographensammlung

Das wertvolle Schriftstück gehöre zu den teuersten Autographen von Kauffmann und sei aber auch „von überragender Wichtigkeit“, teilte die Vorarlberger Landespressestelle in einer Aussendung mit.

Das Dokument verdeutliche, welchen Zuspruch Kauffmann von den herausragenden Persönlichkeiten ihrer Zeit erfahren und mit welchem Selbstbewusstsein sie diesen gegenüber aufgetreten sei, hieß es. Der Brief ist eine bedeutende Erweiterung der Autographensammlung des Felder-Archivs, in der sich schon mehrere Briefe von Angelika Kauffmann befinden.

Angelika Kauffmann wurde am 30. Oktober 1741 in Chur geboren und verstarb am 5. November 1807 in Rom. Ihr Vater, der aus Schwarzenberg stammende Maler Johann Joseph Kauffmann, erkannte früh ihr künstlerisches Talent und unterwies sie in der Malkunst. Sie war eine der bekanntesten schweizerisch-österreichischen Malerinnen des Klassizismus.